Irma Blank, Radical Drawings, Installation view

Irma Blank, Trascrizioni, Gedanken, 1974, indian ink on parchment paper, 14 x 8.25 inches folded into 4 pages

Irma Blank, Eigenschriften, Pagina 93, 1970, pastel on paper, 27.55 x 19.68 inches

Irma Blank, Radical Writings, Racconto, doppia pagina n.6, 1983, Watercolor on paper, 11.81 x 15.75 inches
 

Irma Blank, Radical Writings, Exercitium 15-10-91, 1991, oil on card, 12.99 x 23.62 inches

Irma Blank, Radical Writings, Manoscritto, testo per tutti, 27-9-94, 1994, Oil on card, 7.48 x 10.83 inches
 

Irma Blank and Hamish Fulton, Radical Drawings, Installation view

Hamish Fulton and Hanne Darboven, Radical Drawings, Installation view

Hamish Fulton, Installation view (Eleven pieces of cut ruler for: an eleven day circular walk ten nights camping wind river range Wyoming September 1995, and Counting 343 coloured dots for: counting 49 barefoot paces from and to the tent each morning for seven days. A 14 day walk from sea level up to the highest point and back down to the water edge. Sardinia Italy November 2014)

Hamish Fulton, Counting 343 coloured dots for: counting 49 barefoot paces from and to the tent each morning for seven days. A 14 day walk from sea level up to the highest point and back down to the water edge. Sardinia Italy November 2014, gouache, pencil on paper, in artist frame, 11.85 x 15.11 inches

Hamish Fulton, Eleven pieces of cut ruler for: an eleven day circular walk ten nights camping wind river range Wyoming September 1995. 11 old ruler collector pieces, painted, with climb text, signed, 19 x 29.5 inches

Hanne Darboven, Radical Drawings, Installation view 

Hanne Darboven, Untitled, 1974, ink on paper, Triptych: 8.25 x 11.5 inches each, 8.25 x 24.75 inches overall

Hanne Darboven, Untitled, 1980s, felt tip pen on printed paper, 9.8 x 13.8 inches
 

Ann Hamilton, (Stylus . newspaper/record), 2010, sound, custom-cut vinyl record, 28 screenprinted newspapers, paper, bookbinder's clamshell box, dimension varaiable, Edition of 28. 

Ann Hamilton, (Stylus . newspaper/record), 2010, detail

Stefana McClure, Radical Drawings, Installation view

Stefana McClure, From memory (excerpt from The Oxford Encyclopedic English Dictionary), 2015, Invisible hair net and cut paper.

Stefana McClure, drawing (excerpt from The Oxford Encyclopedic English Dictionary), 2016, Invisible hair net and cut paper
 

Elena del Rivero, Radical Drawings, Installation view

Elena del Rivero, Wound Construction, 2014, Gold leaf on abaca paper, fake pearls on torn Japanese paper over gampi paper and thread and ink, 18 x 12.5 inches
Elena del Rivero, Wound La Donna del Lago, 2014, Gouache on Japanese paper over gampi paper and tarlatan with thread and ink, 18 x 12.5 inches
Elena del Rivero, Wound Construction in Gold and Red, 2014, Gold leaf on torn Japanese paper over gouache on another torn Japanese paper with thread and needle, 18 x 13.5 inches

Elena del Rivero, Wound Construction Wounded, 2014, Gouache on Japanese paper, over gampi paper and tarlatan with thread and ink, 18 x 12.5 inches
 

Hanne Darboven, Untitled, 1982, red and black felt tip pen on paper, 9.8 x 13.8 inches

Charlotte Posenenske, radocal Darwings, Installation view

Charlotte Posenenske, Spachtelarbeit (Palette-knife work), 1957, Casein or ink on paper, 15.62 x 19.62 inches
 

Charlotte Posenenske, Spachtelarbeit (Palette-knife work), 1963, Acrylic on paper, 19.37 x 25.25 inches
 

Charlotte Posenenske, Farbige Skizze (Colored Sketch), 1965, Felt-tip marker on paper, 13.37 x 9.5 inches
 

Charlotte Posenenske, Streifenbild (Striped Picture), 1965, Felt-tip marker on paper, 5.12 x 8 inches
 

Radical Drawings

January 21 – March 12, 2016

 

Brunch: Saturday February 13, from 11am - 2pm

 

 

Radical Drawings is an invitation to take some distance in order to get closer. When carefully examined, a drawing allows one to get away from the global noise and to focus on an artificial silence, a less obvious and predictable world. After overcoming grand ideologies and theses, hope resides in parentheses, the spaces that separate one idea from another, prior and posterior to certainty. Titled after Irma Blank's seminal series Radical Writings, the exhibition offers seven parentheses across generations of artists whose work stand on the border between drawing, knitting and writing.

 

The works in Radical Drawings touch upon the fragile nature of communication. German by birth (Celle, Germany, 1934), Irma Blank moved at a very young age to Italy, where she still lives and works. Her work developed in the atmosphere of linguistic experimentation typical of the second half of the 1960s. While the exponents of the minimal-conceptual avant-gardes recorded the time of their existence through an impersonal and de-subjectivized art, Blank immediately focused, as she says, “on writing, stripping it of meaning, to charge it with other values. A writing purified of sense, an automatic sign that gives voice to the silence.” Her radical and personal response was a writing not linked to knowledge but to being. With ballpoint pen, ink, oil or watercolor on paper, she creates a unique cross section of linguistic and visual representation.

 

Ann Hamilton (Lima, Ohio, 1956) and Elena del Rivero (Valencia, Spain, 1949) share the same interest in the visual and tactile experiences of written language. They explore similarities among the acts of writing, reading and sewing, emphasizing metaphorical connections between text, paper and textile. Their works are sensory explorations of time, language and memory, sometimes combining objects and actions to suggestively reconcile the divide between emotional and conceptual content. Distillation of time and obliteration of information characterize Stefana McClure’s (Lisburn, Northern Ireland, 1959) approach. Her work involves translation, transposition and reconstruction of the traditional forms of the written word. Her new hairnet drawings are inspired by the admonition to carry one's knowledge lightly. The invisible hair nets enable the wearer to bear their learning quietly on their head, woven into a self-conforming and durable ultra-invisible hair net. Magic knit of sheer nylon yarn, these depositories are the ultimate in self-effacement, you are the only one who knows you are wearing it.

 

Known for her large-scale works that combine geometric drawings, numerical series, images and writings, Hanne Darboven (Munich, Germany, 1941 - 2009) is often associated with conceptual art, a correlation that should be nuanced further given the unmistakably subjective nature of the process of realization and expression of her works. Darboven aims to create a new language comprised of linear patterns and numbers, devoid of traditional thought and meaning. She often referred to her work as “mathematical literature.” Hamish Fulton (London, England, 1946) defines himself as a “walking artist.” He creates the foundation for his material works through the seemingly simple act of walking. Representations of the walk itself, Fulton’s works are an acknowledgement of the time dedicated to the experience. They are not meant to act as memories, but rather as a recreation of the original experience for the viewers. Purposefully made of humble materials, such as paper, wooden rulers and photographs, the works align with his belief that the walks and their recreations should leave no trace on the environment. 

 

Charlotte Posenenske’s (Wiesbaden, Germany, 1930 - 1985) drawings from the late ‘50s reveal her exploration of contemporary movements such as Art Informel and Abstract Expressionism. She quickly put aside pure forms of individual expression and started applying paint with a palette knife, creating a greater distance between herself and the painting’s surface. In her early works on paper, the Spachtelarbeit series (palette knife works), Posenenske questions the idea of authorship, playing with ways to eliminate the subjectivity of her hand. In 1968, disappointed by the physical limitations of art to solve societal issues, she made a radical move and terminated her artistic career, turning her attention to sociology. Between precision and chaos, imagination and restrictions, vindication and frailty, fluid deviations and rational forms, Posenenske offers a poetry of improvised action.